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INDIANA

INDIANAWhat do Michael Jackson, corn, racing and basketball have in common? They’re what made Indiana famous. This state is renowned for its agricultural potential and has the nickname of corn state. It’s not entirely inappropriate: Indiana is one of the largest producers of popcorn in the entire country. The state is known also for Indianapolis 500, a motor car race that takes place each year and is generally an incredibly important sports event for the nation. However, Hoosiers seem fonder of basketball, especially if we’re talking about high school students. With the exception of one stadium, all big stadiums for high school basketball are in Indiana.

By labeling it as a flyover state, you’re missing out on what Indiana has to offer. It belongs to the Great Lakes region and at the border with Michigan, the eponymous lake is good for a number of sports, including fishing or swimming. The sandy beaches in Indiana Dunes National Lake-shore Park make it easier for you to enjoy the usual comfort of a day at the beach, surrounded by a blooming nature. For a different type of tourist attraction, Indianapolis Motor Speedway hosts 2 of the main events in this state: Indianapolis 500 and Brickyard 400. Don’t forget to visit the Soldiers and Sailors Monument, the Broad Ripple Village, the Eiteljorg Museum and the many churches, museums and historical places Indiana has to offer.

INDIANAAs for your peers, Hoosiers are very friendly and informal. They’re usually regarded as strong-minded, even stubborn persons who will do as they please. While foreigners complain about how conservative people here can get, Hoosiers don’t actually care much for norms. Younger people live together more often, against their parents’ wishes to get married. They respect other people’s privacy and don’t accept meddling. The most interesting thing about Hoosiers is that nobody knows where the term came from. In other parts of the country, it has a derogatory connotation, along the lines of redneck, but people here are proud to call themselves Hoosiers.

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